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Whoops! A little add on to Acne and Peri

Whoops! A little add on to Acne and Peri

PODCAST EPISODE

Whoops! A little add on to Acne and Peri

PODCAST SUMMARY

 

After I published Tuesday’s episode I realised I’d left out a very important part of the naturopathic management of acne in not only perimenopause but all acne clients.

Listen now to see what it is!

Want my Eight Essential Age -Defying Secrets Every Woman Over 40 Should Know? Of course you do! Click here and download now.

 

About Your Host: Susie Garden

I help women feeling stressed, flat and older than they’d like regain their youthful energy and glow using a proven method so their natural beauty and confidence shines through.

Perimenopause and Eczema

Perimenopause and Eczema

Woman inviting you into the website

As if navigating the hormonal changes of perimenopause wasn’t challenging enough, many women (including myself!) also find themselves grappling with an increase in eczema symptoms during this phase of life, or in my case, eczema for the first time! Yippee!! So my friend, I’m here to help by helping you understand this connection and provide you with some practical tips to manage eczema during perimenopause. So, let’s get started!

Understanding the Connection Between Peri/Meno and Skin

Skin changes are a symptom of fluctuating hormones in women as I’ve outlined in the past couple of blogs and episodes of The Ageless and Awesome Podcast.

The three primary hormones that affect the skin are:

1. Progesterone: Supports oestrogen and keeps skin moist and supple.

2. Oestrogen: Helps with collagen production and maintains skin thickness.

3. Testosterone: Manages sebum production and helps with elasticity.

Of these, oestrogen levels plays the most significant role in your skin health. Oestrogen, also known as estradiol, is a hormone closely linked to the female reproductive system and organs, however it also impacts the body in a number of other functions.

For example: 

– At puberty, oestrogen helps with the growth of long bones and the fusion of growth plates AND protects bones throughout life, preventing osteoporosis.

 – During puberty and pregnancy, oestrogen encourages the growth of mammary ducts.

 – Oestrogen provides lubrication and moisture to vaginal epithelial mucosal cells.

 – Cardiovascular health benefits from oestrogen because it reduces LDL ( “bad cholesterol”) and increases HDL (“good cholesterol”).

Along with these essential functions in your body, oestrogen plays a critical role in keeping skin supple, elastic, and smooth.

Skin Health and Eczema 

Some skin dryness comes from the ageing process. As we get older, our skin becomes less watertight and both men and women experience thinner epithelial layers which allows moisture to evaporate through the skin more quickly.

For women, dry skin also comes from the loss of oestrogen during perimenopause. The skin-smoothing collagen and moisturising oils in the skin are supported with oestrogen so as oestrogen levels drop, a loss of collagen and nourishing oils occurs. Without enough collagen and skin oils, skin becomes less able to retain moisture, making it dry, itchy, and flaky.

Atopic dermatitis, also known as eczema, causes itchy skin, scaly patches, blisters, and dry skin. Although eczema can occur at any time in a person’s life, perimenopause can create the perfect storm for eczema symptoms to appear. In addition to hormonal imbalance, the pH level of perimenopause skin begins to change when a woman nears 50 years of age. Skin can become sensitive and less resilient, resulting in menopause-associated face rashes or eczema. Fabrics, dyes, perfumes, and stress can induce skin reactions much more quickly during perimenopause.

This was certainly the case for me. To listen to my story on The Ageless and Awesome Podcast.

Hormone imbalance is the primary cause of eczema during perimenopause (shocker, right?!?). Diminished oestrogen levels cause the skin to become more reactive to internal and environmental triggers. In addition, age and hormonal imbalance prevent the skin from healing as quickly as it used to, resulting in persistent eczema symptoms. Therefore, women with a previous history of eczema may experience a significant recurrence of their symptoms. For these women, eczema and menopause may go hand in hand.

Managing Eczema in Peri/Menopause

Moisturise, Moisturise, Moisturise!

One of the most crucial steps in managing eczema is to keep your skin well-hydrated. Opt for fragrance-free and hypoallergenic moisturisers to avoid any potential irritants. Also be mindful of using natural ingredients wherever possible to avoid endocrine disrupting chemicals that can further contribute to hormone fluctuations. Apply moisturiser immediately after bathing to lock in the moisture. Consider using thicker ointments or creams rather than lotions (especially in the cooler, drier months), as they provide a stronger barrier for your skin.

Choose Gentle and Fragrance Free Products

Perimenopause itself can be a stressful time due to the various physical and During perimenopause, your skin may become more sensitive, so it’s essential to choose gentle skincare and household products. Avoid harsh soaps, detergents, and other potential irritants that may exacerbate your eczema symptoms. Opt for products labeled as “fragrance-free” or “hypoallergenic” to minimise the risk of skin irritation.

Manage Your Stress

Stress can trigger or worsen eczema symptoms. Perimenopause itself can be a stressful time due to the various physical and emotional changes you may be experiencing plus the life stressors in our 40s/50s can be increased. Engage in stress-reducing activities such as deep breathing exercises, yoga, meditation, or engaging in anything that brings you joy. Taking care of your mental well-being can have a positive impact on your skin.

Nourish Your Body

A nourishing diet with the ideal foods for your skin and hormones can work wonders for your skin health. Include foods rich in omega-3 fatty acids, such as fatty fish (salmon, mackerel), chia seeds, and walnuts. These healthy fats have anti-inflammatory properties that may help reduce eczema flare-ups. Avoid potential trigger foods like dairy, gluten, and certain spices, as they can worsen inflammation in some individuals or get your very own personalised nutrition plan in The Glow Protocol™️ so that you know the EXACT foods for your optimal health. It was life changing for me and my skin.

Consult a Practitioner

If your eczema symptoms become severe or you just can’t seem to get on top of it, it’s best to seek professional help. A qualified Health Care Practitioner, (err…like me!) can provide personalised advice and recommend the best management plan for your situation. You’ll be so glad you did. 

Of course, this is general advice and not a personalised protocol. If you’re look for a more personalised approach and a protocol with the EXACT strategy for your individual biochemistry, then click this link to learn more.

Susie Garden | Clinical Nutritionist & Naturopath

Are you a woman feeling stressed, flat and experiencing the challenges of peri/menopause?
It’s time to reclaim your youthful energy, radiance and self-assurance (and your ideal weight).
I’m here to help with my proven method.

Book your complimentary Pre-Screening Call here, and let’s see how I might help you.

Understanding The Gut-Skin Connection

Understanding The Gut-Skin Connection

Woman with brain fog

In recent years, researchers have uncovered a fascinating connection between the gut and the skin. Referred to as the gut-skin connection, this bi-directional relationship has emerged as an exciting field of research. Let’s shed some light on this connection and its implications for our health. By understanding how gut issues and inflammation can impact the skin, we can take proactive steps to get that skin glowing and promote optimal well-being.

The Gut-Skin Connection

The gut-skin connection operates in both directions, with the gut influencing the skin and vice versa. Gut issues, such as bloating, constipation, diarrhoea, and medically diagnosed conditions like IBS, ulcerative colitis, and Crohn’s disease, can sometimes reflect in the skin by causing inflammation. This inflammation often manifests as various skin conditions, including eczema, psoriasis, dermatitis, rosacea, acne, rashes, and itchiness.

Leaky Gut and Increased Intestinal Permeability

The root cause of gut-related skin inflammation lies in a phenomenon known as increased intestinal permeability or ‘leaky gut’. Intestinal permeability refers to the ability of nutrients and water to pass through the intestinal wall into the bloodstream. Under normal circumstances, tight junctions in the intestinal lining prevent the passage of unwanted molecules.

However, when gut inflammation is present, these tight junctions may become slightly more permeable, allowing clusters of molecules to pass through. This should not happen under normal circumstances, and the presence of these molecules or microbial components in the bloodstream triggers an immune response. Symptoms such as brain fog, skin inflammation, and various other manifestations may occur as a result.

Menopause and Perimenopause:

During menopause and perimenopause, the fluctuating levels of estrogen can contribute to increased intestinal permeability. Estrogen fluctuations, particularly the periods of decreased estrogen, can exacerbate leaky gut and skin conditions. Skin issues like eczema, psoriasis, and rosacea are commonly associated with these hormonal changes. Factors such as stress, lack of sleep, poor diet, certain medications (e.g., nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs), and alcohol consumption can further contribute to increased intestinal permeability, compounding the skin issues experienced during menopause and perimenopause.

Additional Considerations:

Beyond hormonal changes, factors such as low stomach acid, poor digestion, and dietary choices can impact gut health and skin conditions. Low stomach acid and poor digestion have been reported in a significant number of acne sufferers. Therefore, it is crucial to assess the effectiveness of digestive processes and ensure proper breakdown of food through adequate chewing and mindful eating habits. Conditions like small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) can also influence skin health, with SIBO increasing the risk of rosacea.

Conclusion:

Recognizing the profound influence of the gut-skin connection on our overall health is essential, especially for women going through menopause and perimenopause. By addressing gut health issues and promoting intestinal healing, we can reduce skin inflammation, have glowing skin and improve our well-being. Identifying problematic foods through a food journal and seeking professional guidance for gut healing strategies, rather than resorting to self-administered probiotics, are some of the steps to take. Additionally, prioritising hydration, quality sleep and stress management can further improve overall skin health.

This is the first in a series of skin health posts where I’ll dive deeper into topics such as wrinkles, sagging, and collagen loss to provide more support and advice. Remember, the journey to optimal skin health begins with small but meaningful steps, such as eliminating problematic foods and embracing habits that promote a healthy gut and radiant skin.

Of course, this is general advice and not a personalised protocol. If you’re look for a more personalised approach and a protocol with the EXACT strategy for your individual biochemistry, then click this link to learn more.

Susie Garden | Clinical Nutritionist & Naturopath

Are you a woman feeling stressed, flat and experiencing the challenges of peri/menopause?
It’s time to reclaim your youthful energy, radiance and self-assurance (and your ideal weight).
I’m here to help with my proven method.

Book your complimentary Pre-Screening Call here, and let’s see how I might help you.

Nourishing Roasted Pumpkin and White Bean Soup

Nourishing Roasted Pumpkin and White Bean Soup

Woman with brain fog

Soup is a brilliant option to get lots of good veggies into you in a delicious, nurturing way.  Soups are easy and quick to make as well AND it gives you an excuse to eat toast for dinner!

My Nourishing Roasted Pumpkin and White Bean Soup has a natural sweetness from both the pumpkin and the roasting process.  Roasting the vegies until they start caramelising gives this soup some gorgeous extra flavours and depth.  It also helps release the betacarotene from the carrots to make it easier to absorb.

The white beans give a nice boost of protein which is satisfying and gives this soup a delicious creaminess.  The beans increase the fibre content, which helps to lower cholesterol and stabilise blood glucose levels, keeping you fuller for longer.

The pumpkin and carrot is packed with Vitamin A (supports the immune system) and betacarotene which is a major antioxidant vitamin which reduces inflammation in the body.  Adding in the ginger boosts the anti-inflammatory nature of this soup as well.

This soup is delicious served with some organic wholegrain sourdough bread or toast brushed with extra virgin olive oil.  You can also sprinkle some pumpkin seeds or pine nuts on top for some extra crunch.

Ingredients

1kg Jap pumpkin, cut into 2cm chunks

1 large carrot, cut into 2 cm chunks

1 large onion, cut into 2 cm chunks

4 cloves whole garlic, peeled

1 tblsp olive oil

2 tsp smoked paprika

1 litre good quality vegetable stock

1 BPA free tin of cannellini beans

1 tsp fresh ginger, grated

½ tsp dried chilli, to taste

Method

Preheat the oven to 180 deg C.

Place all of the chopped vegies in a large bowl and coat them with the olive oil and smoked paprika.

Lay the vegetables out on a baking tray and roast for 30 minutes, or until cooked through.

Set aside to cool slightly.

Place the roasted vegetables, the cannellini beans, ginger and vegetable stock in a blender and puree.

Put the pureed soup into a large saucepan over a low heat and simmer gently. If you like a bit of spice you can add the dried chilli, and stir through.

Simmer the soup until it’s warmed through your desired temperature.

Season to taste and serve with bread of your choice. Enjoy!

 

Susie Garden | Clinical Nutritionist & Naturopath

Are you a woman feeling stressed, flat and experiencing the challenges of peri/menopause?
It’s time to reclaim your youthful energy, radiance and self-assurance (and your ideal weight).
I’m here to help with my proven method.

Book your complimentary Pre-Screening Call here, and let’s see how I might help you.

The Hormonal Impact on Eczema during Perimenopause

The Hormonal Impact on Eczema during Perimenopause

PODCAST EPISODE

The Hormonal Impact on Eczema during Perimenopause

PODCAST SUMMARY

 

I’ll never forget the day I realised my eczema was linked to perimenopause. It felt like a cruel joke, as if dealing with hormonal changes wasn’t enough! So, I decided to take matters into my own hands and dive deep into understanding how hormones, especially oestrogen, influence our skin health and contribute to eczema flare-ups during this transitional stage of life. Join me as I share my personal journey and reveal how internal and external factors like stress, hormones, gut health, and environmental triggers can flare up eczema during perimenopause.

 

Finding relief from eczema during perimenopause can feel like an uphill battle, but I’ve got you covered! I’m sharing some of my favourite gentle, fragrance-free and natural skincare products that have made a world of difference for my sensitive skin. We’ll also explore the potential impacts of perfumes as endocrine disruptors and discuss how stress management techniques, a nutritious diet, and staying hydrated can help reduce eczema flare-ups.

Don’t miss this informative and personal episode on managing eczema during perimenopause!

 

About Your Host: Susie Garden

I help women feeling stressed, flat and older than they’d like regain their youthful energy and glow using a proven method so their natural beauty and confidence shines through.